Could you be our 2015 award winner?

Presented annually, the Weston Youth Innovation Award was created to encourage and recognize young Canadian innovators. It provides students aged 14 to 18 a unique way to share their ideas and get the word out to a much larger audience! Interested? Why not tell us about your accomplishments? You could be the next Weston Youth Innovation Award winner.

Sticky note tacked to page reads: Check out past winners

Know an outstanding individual who might qualify or want to nominate yourself?

Send us a short email with contact info and we’ll be in touch!


Who is eligible?

We look for individuals or groups who:

  1. are between the ages of 14 and 18,
  2. have used science and/or technology as the basis for developing creative and innovative ideas aimed at solving real-world problems,
  3. put their ideas into action, and as a result, have had a positive impact either in their own community or on a broader scale.

Download the complete Rules and Regulations for all the details.

 


What are the prizes?

In addition to cash and other prizes, the winner's work will be featured in a professional animation on display in the Weston Family Innovation Centre at the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto, visited by over 1,000,000 guests each year! It will also be posted on this website, in order to inspire other youth to think, work and collaborate in new ways.

Download the complete Rules and Regulations for all the details.

 


 

Past Winners:

2014 Weston Youth Innovation Award

The recipient of the 2014 Weston Youth Innovation Award was 16-yeard-old Ann Makosinski of Victoria, B.C. for her development of a flashlight powered by the heat of the human hand.

Finalists for 2014 Weston Youth Innovation Award included

  • Duncan Stothers of Vancouver, BC for his "Front Impact Reduction System (FIRST) Frame Bicycle".
  • Maya Burhanpurkar of Shanty Bay, ON for her work on a "Cardio-Protective Drug for Seniors with Alzheimers".
  • Alexander Deans of Windsor, ON for his "iAID Navigation Device for the Visually Impaired".
  • Roman Kozak of Grimsby, ON for his "Sign-Language Translator Glove".

The 2014 Review Panel

  • Joe Deklic, Vice-President, Strategic Investments Group, Cisco Systems Canada
  • Dr. Hooley McLaughlin, Vice President Science Experience and Chief Science Officer, Ontario Science Centre
  • Dr. Kyla Sask, Co-ordinator of Engineering Enrichment and Outreach at Ryerson University
  • Mike Serbinis, Founder, Vice Chair, Kobo Inc.

2013 Weston Youth Innovation Award

Adam Noble of Lakefield, Ontario, for his work developing a biofilter to remove nanosilver from wastewater. View the press release.

Finalists for 2013 Weston Youth Innovation Award included

  • Jessie MacAlpine (Woodstock, Ontario), combined garlic mustard and coffee grinds to produce an environmentally friendly and effective herbicide.
  • Jamil Merali (Corbeil, Ontario), built a haptic shoe with GPS receiver, motors, and ultrasonic sensors to aid people with various physical and mental challenges.
  • Kyle Potts (Barrie, Ontario),developed a method to produce stronger-than-wood panels from agricultural waste.
  • Soumya Srinivasan (Ottawa, Ontario), designed a reliable and portable device to prevent drowning.
  • Janelle Tam (Waterloo, Ontario), discovered that nano-crystalline cellulose from trees is a powerful anti-oxidant that can be used in food, health care, and cosmetics.

The 2013 Review Panel

  • Dr. Hooley McLaughlin, Vice President Science Experience and Chief Science Officer, Ontario Science Centre
  • Serena Mitchell, Representative, W. Garfield Weston Foundation
  • Dr. Barbara Sherwood Lollar, Professor, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Toronto, Director, Stable Isotope Laboratory, Board Member, Ontario Science Centre
  • Dr. Marc Nantel, PhD, P.Phys., Associate Vice-President – Research & Innovation, Niagara College Canada

2012 Weston Youth Innovation Award

Charlotte Donaldson and Megan Smith of Nova Scotia, for their work developing an improved "Universal Spinal Board" to aid in the rescue of victims of spinal injuries.

Honourable Mention:

The Award Selection Committee wishes to recognize Shayla Larson and Adam Noble of Ontario for their work using Euglena cells to test the toxicity of nanosilver in Canada's water systems.

Finalists for 2012 Weston Youth Innovation Award included:

  • Rachel Brown and Katie van der Sloot of Alberta for their investigations and community activism related to Triclosan and its role in contributing to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
  • The Sentinels (Lego Robotics Team 3663) of Ontario for their work developing a new biomedical device to aid in diabetes management.
  • Marshall Zhang of Ontario for his work researching a possible new drug treatment for cystic fibrosis. 2011 Weston Youth Innovation Award.

2011 Weston Youth Innovation Award

Please note that the Weston Youth Innovation Award was not awarded in 2011. After careful deliberation, the Review Panel determined that none of that year's submissions met all the required criteria.

2010 Weston Youth Innovation Award

Kimberly Gulevich of British Columbia, for her work exploring the use of methane capture as a way to provide energy to small rural households that use sewage lagoons. A clean form of energy and a renewable resource, methane could potentially help reduce the carbon footprint of these households.

Honourable Mention:

The Award Selection Committee recognized Meredith Drieseberg and Kathleen Skyvington for iCCOMMIT, a youth movement to fight climate change.

Finalists for 2010 Weston Youth Innovation Award included:

  • Sophia Coulter English and Gillian Walczak for "The Perfect Plastic", a project to develop bio-degradable plastic from simple household products.
  • Katrine Masters and Cynthya Peloquin for "Suivi de population de poissons dans le ruisseau Cacouna", a project to assess the health and outcome of a trout-stocking program in Drummondville, Quebec.

2009 Weston Youth Innovation Award

Eden Full of Alberta, for her work with Dynamic Photovoltaics, a passive solar tracker that moves panels towards the sun using inexpensive, environmentally-safe materials that are commonly found in developing countries and elsewhere. The device maximizes the efficiency of solar panels by having them track the sun during the course of the day, and can be easily maintained and repaired with simple instructions.

Finalists for 2009 Weston Youth Innovation Award included:

  • Albert Hu, founder of the Northern Secondary Robotic Innovation Team (Toronto, ON).
  • Courtney Marshall, Adam Mitchell and Jake Mitchell (Napanee, ON), with the Solar Stirling Engine Project.
  • Meredith Drieseberg, Azra Shirji and Meagan McKeen (Oakville, ON) with iCCOMMIT, a youth movement to fight climate change.

 

The Weston Youth Innovation Award is generously supported by The W. Garfield Weston Foundation and is administered by the Ontario Science Centre.