Our Green Planet

Our Green Planet

It’s time to get your hands dirty with activities that look at the food we grow, the trees that shade us and the creatures that share the world around us. Plus, see how nature inspires some of the amazing costumes seen at the Caribbean Carnival and how high tech tools help bring them from imagination to parade route. This week is all about the beauty of Earth and how we can help keep it green. Get your science notebook ready because you’re going to want to write this all down!


21st Century Carnival | Facebook Live

SugaCayne’s designers discuss blending traditional techniques and high-tech tools to bring carnival costumes to life.

 

A planter made out of a plastic bottle with a plant growing in it.
Create a Bottle Garden

This Plastic Free July, repurpose a plastic pop bottle to create your very own indoor or outdoor bottle garden. Repot an existing plant or sprinkle seeds and watch them sprout. It’s a perfect summer activity for both big and little hands!

Bottle Garden
Tomatoes on the vine.
How Does Your Garden Grow? | Photo Challenge

Create a Bottle Garden
If you garden, you’re a scientist! Chemistry, biology, ecology—it’s all there in the soil. How does your garden grow? Whether it’s indoors or outdoors, edible or floral, show us your growing experiments in action by tagging us on social media.

Facebook and Instagram: @ontariosciencecentre
Twitter: @ontsciencectr

Instagram
A green maple leaf.
Leaf Identification Game

Do you know your white oaks from your red maples? A Quercus alba from an Acer rubrum? Challenge yourself and learn something new by matching leaves to their trees in this play-at-home game that will have you looking up on your next trip outside.

Leaf Identification Game
A magnifying glass inspecting some foliage.
Citizen Science: FrogWatch

By looking for frogs, you can help scientists track the effects of climate change. Learn how to identify local amphibians by sight and sound and record your observations in your science notebook to share the data with researchers.

Frog Watch

Media Partner Toronto Star